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Web developers rejoice; Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10 die on Tuesday

Written by admin on . Posted in Technology

Internet Explorer has long been the bane of many Web developers’ existence, but here’s some news to brighten your day: Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10 are reaching ‘end of life’ on Tuesday, meaning they’re no longer supported by Microsoft. A patch, which goes live on January 12, will nag Internet Explorer users on launch to upgrade to a modern browser. KB3123303 adds the nag box, which will appear for Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 users still using the old browsers after installing the update. It’s great news for developers who still need to target older browsers — not needing to worry about whether or not modern CSS works in these browsers is a dream, and it’s much closer with this move. End of life means the browsers will no longer receive security updates or any other kind of patches, leaving those running them wide open to new vulnerabilities in the future. The nag can be disabled by those in enterprises who haven’t made the upgrade yet, through the registry, though it’s probably easier just to jump onto Internet Explorer 11. What’s even bigger about the end of life for these versions is that this means Internet Explorer 11 is the last version of Microsoft’s old browser that’s left supported, as the company continues to transition customers to Edge on Windows 10. If you’re still using any version of Internet Explorer below 11, it’s time to upgrade now, before it’s too late.

Penguin 5, With The Penguin 2.1 Spam-Filtering Algorithm

Written by admin on . Posted in Tech Blog

google-panda-penguin The fifth confirmed release of Google’s “Penguin” spam fighting algorithm is live. That makes it Penguin 5 by our count. But since this Penguin update is using a slightly improved version of Google’s “Penguin 2″ second-generation technology, Google itself is calling it “Penguin 2.1.” Don’t worry. We’ll explain the numbering  below, as well as what this all means for publishers. New Version Of Penguin Live Today The head of Google’s web spam team, Matt Cutts, shared the news on Twitter, saying the latest release would impact about 1 percent of all searches: The link that Cutts points at, by the way, explains what Penguin was when it was first launched. It doesn’t cover anything new or changed with the latest release.

Previous Updates Here are all the confirmed releases of Penguin to date:

  1. Penguin 1 on April 24, 2012 (impacting around 3.1% of queries)
  2. Penguin 2 on May 26, 2012 (impacting less than 0.1%)
  3. Penguin 3 on October 5, 2012 (impacting around 0.3% of queries)
  4. Penguin 4 (AKA Penguin 2.0) on May 22, 2013 (impacting 2.3% of queries)
  5. Penguin 5 (AKA Penguin 2.1) on Oct. 4, 2013 (impacting around 1% of queries)

Why Penguin 2.1 AND Penguin 5?

If us talking about Penguin 5 in reference to something Google is calling Penguin 2.1 hurts your head, believe us, it hurts ours, too. But you can pin that blame back on Google. Here’s why. When Google started releasing its “Panda” algorithm designed to fight low-quality content, it called the first one simply “Panda.” So when the second came out, people referred to that as “Panda 2.” When the third came out, people called that Panda 3 — causing Google to say that the third release, because it was relatively minor, really only should be called Panda 2.1 — the “point” being used to indicate how much a minor change it was. Google eventually — and belatedly — indicated that a Panda 3 release happened, causing the numbering to move into Panda 3.0, Panda 3.1 and so on until there had been so many “minor” updates that we having to resort to going further out in decimal places to things like Panda 3.92. That caused us here at Search Engine Land to decide it would be easier all around if we just numbered any confirmed update sequentially, in order of when they came. No matter how “big” or “small” an update might be, we’d just give it the next number on the list: Penguin 1, Penguin 2, Penguin 3 and so on.

Thanks For The Headache, Google

That worked out fine until Penguin 4, because Google typically didn’t give these updates numbers itself. It just said there was an update, and left it to us or others to attach a number to it. But when Penguin 4 arrived, Google really wanted to stress that it was using what it deemed to be a major, next-generation change in how Penguin works. So, Google called it Penguin 2, despite all the references to a Penguin 2 already being out there, despite the fact it hadn’t really numbered many of these various updates before. Today’s update, as can be seen above, has been dubbed Penguin 2.1 — so supposedly, it’s a relatively minor change to the previous Penguin filter that was being used. However, if it’s impacting around 1 percent of queries as Google says, that means it is more significant than what Google might have considered to be similar “minor” updates of Penguin 1.1 and Penguin 1.2.

What Is Penguin Again? And How Do I Deal With It?

For those new to the whole “Penguin” concept, Penguin is a part of Google’s overall search algorithm that periodically looks for sites that are deemed to be spamming Google’s search results but somehow still ranking well. In particular, it goes after sites that may have purchased paid links. If you were hit by Penguin, you’ll likely know if you see a marked drop in traffic that begins today or tomorrow. To recover, you’ll need to do things like disavow bad links or manually have those removed. Filing a reconsideration request doesn’t help, because Penguin is an automated process. Until it sees that what it considers to be bad has been removed, you don’t recover. If you were previously hit by Penguin and have taken actions hopefully meant to fix that, today and tomorrow are the days to watch. If you see an improvement in traffic, that’s a sign that you’ve escaped Penguin.  

What About Hummingbird?

If you’re wondering about how Penguin fits into that new Google Hummingbird algorithm you may have heard about, think of Penguin as a part of Hummingbird, not as a replacement for it. Hummingbird is like Google’s entire ranking engine, whereas Penguin is like a small part of that engine, a filter that is removed and periodically replaced with what Google considers to be a better filter to help keep out bad stuff. To understand more about that relationship and Hummingbird in general, see our post below:

WhatsApp for PC or Computer

Written by admin on . Posted in Tech Blog

Free download WhatsApp for PC or Computer [Tutorial]

Please follow each and very step which is given below as it will help you to use WhatsApp on PC or Computer easily without any further more problems.
  • Use Android Emulator named Bluestacks for the guide.
  • Download Bluestacks (Windows & MAC OS) for further functioning.
  • Once Bluestacks is downloaded, install it and wait for the installation to get completed.
  • Just follow the instructions coming on screen and open the software
  • Use search function for Whatsapp or click on messenger.
  • Locate and click on its icon
  • The Whatsapp messenger for PC will be downloaded on your screen
  • Whatsapp for PC will auto install itself and you can use it now.
Note : You can even download the APK file of this app from other websites (Just search “WhatsApp Apk file” and download it after installing Bluestacks) bluestacks-WhatsApp-Android-Emulator-infinity360 Download WhatsApp Computer Version without Emulator whatsapp_logo_vectorIt is very simple but time consuming process. You need to browse through several links to find full version of WhatsApp for PC. Some links or most of the links are fake. This takes a lot of time in finding the right downloading link. But as soon as you find the right link to download Whatsapp for PC, it will need a simple click to download it. Now just click the downloaded file and install it on your PC.